Article Side

Online Article Directory!

Hello Guest! Login or Register to submit articles!

Beginners German Lessons to Get You Started with Learning German

By Bindas Bol Foreign Language Institute Subscribe to RSS | December 23rd 2011 | Views:
loading
 
  



German lessons for German Beginners number one – German language alphabets: Basic German alphabets are an extended version of Latin. This composes of 30 letters. German language uses 26 letters that are same as English alphabets plus four extra letters. Let us have a look at these 26 alphabets (uppercase and lowercase) plus the extra four alphabets with its pronunciation in bracket:

A a (ah), Ä ä (ay), B b (bay), C c (say), D d (day), E e (ay), F f (eff), G g (gay), H h (haa), I i (eeh), J j (yot), K k (kah), L l (ell), M m (emm), N n (enn), O o (oh), Ö ö (ooh), P p (pay), Q q (koo), R r (err), S s (ess), ß (ess-zett), T t (tay), U u (ooh), Ü ü (uyuh), V v (fow), W w (vay), X x (ixx), Y y (oop-see-lohn), Z z (zett).

German lessons for German Beginners number two – German language vowels: Basic German beginners should know German vowels have both long and short variants, and would-be long vowels. German is a much more phonetically consistent language than English. German has eight vowels: a, e, i, o, u, ä, ö and ü. They can be short or long. Vowel length makes a difference in word meaning.

German vowels (long and short)

A – Long like “a” in hard and short like between the vowels in English hut” and “hot” very short and clipped.

E – Long like the vowel in English "say", but with lips extremely spread and no off glide into an "ee"-sound. Short like e in set, but even shorter.

I – Long like “ee” in feet. Short like the vowel in English "mitt", but very short and clipped.

O – Long like vowel in English "so", but with lips extremely rounded and no off glide into an "ooh"-sound. Short like o in hot, but even shorter.

U – Long like “oo” in boot, said with pursed lips. Short like the vowel in English "bush", but very short and clipped.

Ȧ – Long like "ä" sound - which can be written "ä" or "äh", but never "ää" - is pronounced like the "a" sound in the English "day" or "played", but the German sound is a longer one which does not slide away into "ee" as the English sounds tends. Short like "ä" sound - which can only be written "ä" - sounds like the "e" in English "get" or "set".

Ö – Long somewhat like the vowel in English "burn". To produce it, say the German long e, then round the lips as for the long “o”. Short like a shorter version of German long “ö”. To produce it, say the German short e then round the lips as for the short o.

Ü – German long "ü" and short "ü" are two of the hardest sounds for the English speaker to master, as there are no direct equivalents in the English language. (ü) Similar to “ew” in pew. It’s a shorter version of German long ü. To produce it, say the German short i, then round the lips as for short u.

German lessons for German beginners number three – diphthongs: Diphthongs are combinations of two vowels in one syllable (as in the English “lie”). German language has quite a few of them. Instead of being pronounced separately, the two letters have one sound or pronunciation. An example would be the au combination. The diphthong au in German always has the sound OW, as in English “ouch” (the "ou" being an English diphthong; the au is also part of the German word autsch, which is pronounced almost the same as “ouch” in English!). This kind of information is very useful to know when you are taking basic German lessons to pronounce German. German has three diphthongs: ai, oi, and au.

• [ai]

Pronunciation: Like the vowel sound in English "mine", but more clipped and tense.

• [oi]

Pronunciation: Like the vowel sound in English "coin", but more clipped and tense.

• [au]

Pronunciation: Like the vowel sound in English "house", but more clipped and tense.

Bindas Bol Foreign Language Institute - About Author:
Meet the experts in Beginners German Tutorials - Locate your nearest German Language Counsellor in Mumbai at Courses.bindas-bol.com

Share on Facebook Tweet It Stumbleupon this post This post is delicious !

Article Source:
http://www.articleside.com/language-articles/beginners-german-lessons-to-get-you-started-with-learning-german.htm

Related Language Articles Subscribe to RSS

Choice for Learning Languages by Taking Online English Course to Learn English Online
Published by Oxford School Of Languages on August 23rd 2012 | Language
There will be many different ways that you might find for learning languages these days. Online cou...
 
Options to Learning English including Learning Maya and Understanding the Mayan Language
Published by Oxford School Of Languages on August 23rd 2012 | Language
There are many different reasons why a person might be studying the Mayan language today. Learning a...
 
Reviews - Stretching for the Truth
Published by PATRICKGIBBS on August 14th 2012 | Language
Reviews anyone whose goal is to raise as much meat as they can require heavy. Lots of food, rest. An...
 
Business Coaching Courses – Amazing Results for Entrepreneurs on Gloomy Markets
Published by Peak Performance on August 8th 2012 | Language
The business market of the world are going through serious phase of recession since many past years ...
 
A Brief Guide to Becoming an NLP Practitioner
Published by Peak Performance on August 8th 2012 | Language
NLP Practitioner is an individual that practices Neuro-linguistic Programming (NLP). NLP is a techni...
 
The Beautiful Spanish Language
Published by Ih Spain on August 4th 2012 | Language
Spanish is a growing language; it is beautiful and comes with its own quirkiness. The Spanish langua...